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This is an IELTS writing task 2 sample answer essay on the topic of internet news from the real IELTS exam.

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Dave

IELTS Essay: Internet News

More and more people no longer read newspapers or watch TV programmes to get their news and instead read online.

Is this a positive or negative development?

Increasingly large segments of the population now receive their news online, rather than from the physical editions of newspapers. In my opinion, though the conveniences of technology are self-evident, this trend is a negative on the whole.

Proponents of modern habits of reading news argue it is more convenient. Examples of this abound. Consumers can search Google or Apple News and locate articles from thousands of online papers and websites, enabling them to access the news that matters the most to them more efficiently. Furthermore, they can do this while they are commuting to work or during various periods of inactivity throughout the day. It is even possible on most websites to listen to an audio version of the news, a tremendous advance for the visually impaired. All these modern features of online news only hint at the innovations to come and validate the decline of the publishing industry.

Nonetheless, the quality of online news is considerably lower on most websites. There are exceptions, such as websites that specialise in a given subject-area and employ intelligent contributors, however, the vast majority of the online news industry cynically pursues advertising revenue at any cost. Most stories are written hastily, the headlines are misleading, and the news articles themselves may be rife with unchecked facts and unprofessional prose. Retractions to reporting errors go unnoticed. The situation developing from this is that most individuals now read the news either to confirm their biases and gain a momentary burst of endorphins or out of outrage, so-called ‘hate-reading’, for the very same reason. It is therefore justified to claim that the relationship between publisher and audience is exploitive, not educational.

In conclusion, easier access to news does not outweigh the bad habits instilled by online news. Governments will likely never regulate this industry properly so it falls to individuals to make more informed choices when consuming media.

Analysis

1. Increasingly large segments of the population now receive their news online, rather than from the physical editions of newspapers. 2. In my opinion, though the conveniences of technology are self-evident, this trend is a negative on the whole.

  1. Paraphrase the overall essay topic.
  2. Write a clear opinion. Read more about introductions here.

1. Proponents of modern habits of reading news argue it is more convenient. 2. Examples of this abound. 3. Consumers can search Google or Apple News and locate articles from thousands of online papers and websites, enabling them to access the news that matters the most to them more efficiently. 4. Furthermore, they can do this while they are commuting to work or during various periods of inactivity throughout the day. 5. It is even possible on most websites to listen to an audio version of the news, a tremendous advance for the visually impaired. 6. All these modern features of online news only hint at the innovations to come and validate the decline of the publishing industry.

  1. Write a topic sentence with a clear main idea at the end.
  2. Explain your main idea.
  3. Develop it with specific examples.
  4. Continue to develop it.
  5. State the result.
  6. Develop it even more fully if possible.

1. Nonetheless, the quality of online news is considerably lower on most websites. 2. There are exceptions, such as websites that specialise in a given subject-area and employ intelligent contributors, however, the vast majority of the online news industry cynically pursues advertising revenue at any cost. 3. Most stories are written hastily, the headlines are misleading, and the news articles themselves may be rife with unchecked facts and unprofessional prose. 4. Retractions to reporting errors go unnoticed. 5. The situation developing from this is that most individuals now read the news either to confirm their biases and gain a momentary burst of endorphins or out of outrage, so-called ‘hate-reading’, for the very same reason. 6. It is therefore justified to claim that the relationship between publisher and audience is exploitive, not educational.

  1. Write a new topic sentence with a new main idea at the end.
  2. Explain your new main idea.
  3. Include specific details and examples.
  4. The more specific, the better.
  5. Continue your development.
  6. Add on any extra detail that you can that is related for a better task achievement score.

1. In conclusion, easier access to news does not outweigh the bad habits instilled by online news. 2. Governments will likely never regulate this industry properly so it falls to individuals to make more informed choices when consuming media.

  1. Summarise your main ideas.
  2. Include a final thought. Read more about conclusions here.

Vocabulary

What do the words in bold below mean? Make some notes and then check below.

Increasingly large segments of the population now receive their news online, rather than from the physical editions of newspapers. In my opinion, though the conveniences of technology are self-evident, this trend is a negative on the whole.

Proponents of modern habits of reading news argue it is more convenient. Examples of this abound. Consumers can search Google or Apple News and locate articles from thousands of online papers and websites, enabling them to access the news that matters the most to them more efficiently. Furthermore, they can do this while they are commuting to work or during various periods of inactivity throughout the day. It is even possible on most websites to listen to an audio version of the news, a tremendous advance for the visually impaired. All these modern features of online news only hint at the innovations to come and validate the decline of the publishing industry.

Nonetheless, the quality of online news is considerably lower on most websites. There are exceptions, such as websites that specialise in a given subject-area and employ intelligent contributors, however, the vast majority of the online news industry cynically pursues advertising revenue at any cost. Most stories are written hastily, the headlines are misleading, and the news articles themselves may be rife with unchecked facts and unprofessional prose. Retractions to reporting errors go unnoticed. The situation developing from this is that most individuals now read the news either to confirm their biases and gain a momentary burst of endorphins or out of outrage, so-calledhate-reading‘, for the very same reason. It is therefore justified to claim that the relationship between publisher and audience is exploitive, not educational.

In conclusion, easier access to news does not outweigh the bad habits instilled by online news. Governments will likely never regulate this industry properly so it falls to individuals to make more informed choices when consuming media.

Answers

increasingly large segments of the population more and more people

rather than instead of

physical editions real copies

conveniences easier to use

self-evident obvious

trend pattern

on the whole in general

proponents supporters

modern habits the way people act now

argue claim

convenient easy and simple to use

abound are common

consumers customers

locate articles find news

enabling allowing for

access get to

matters the most to them care about the most

efficiently without wasting energy

while at the same time

commuting travelling to work/school

during various periods of inactivity throughout the day when not doing something

possible could happen

audio version can be listened to

tremendous advance huge step forward

visually impaired hard to see

modern features new abilities

hint look forward to

innovations to come changes in the future

validate justify

decline decrease

publishing industry magazines, newspapers, books

nonetheless regardless

considerably lower much less

exceptions outliers

specialise focus on

subject-area field of work

employ intelligent contributors hire smart writers

vast majority most of

online news industry websites posting news

cynically pursues just trying to get

advertising revenue money from ads

at any cost unethically

written hastily written quickly

misleading not accurate

rife with unchecked facts full of mistakes

unprofessional prose badly written

retractions mistakes corrected later

reporting errors mistakes

unnoticed not seen

situation context

confirm their biases agree with their views

gain a momentary burst of endorphins feel happy for a minute

out of outrage in anger

so-called allegedly

hate-reading‘ reading just because you hate an article

very same reason exact same cause

therefore justified that’s why it should be so

claim argue

relationship interaction

publisher magazines, sites, etc.

exploitive taking advantage of

educational making your smarter

outweigh stronger than

instilled encouraged

regulate make laws about

properly well

falls to lies with

make more informed choices make better choices

consuming media reading/listening to news

Pronunciation

ɪnˈkriːsɪŋli lɑːʤ ˈsɛgmənts ɒv ðə ˌpɒpjʊˈleɪʃən 
ˈrɑːðə ðæn 
ˈfɪzɪkəl ɪˈdɪʃənz 
kənˈviːniənsɪz 
sɛlf-ˈɛvɪdənt
trɛnd 
ɒn ðə həʊl
prəˈpəʊnənts 
ˈmɒdən ˈhæbɪts 
ˈɑːgjuː 
kənˈviːniənt
əˈbaʊnd
kənˈsjuːməz 
ləʊˈkeɪt ˈɑːtɪklz 
ɪˈneɪblɪŋ 
ˈæksɛs 
ˈmætəz ðə məʊst tuː ðɛm 
ɪˈfɪʃəntli
waɪl 
kəˈmjuːtɪŋ 
ˈdjʊərɪŋ ˈveərɪəs ˈpɪərɪədz ɒv ˌɪnækˈtɪvɪti θru(ː)ˈaʊt ðə deɪ
ˈpɒsəbl 
ˈɔːdɪˌəʊ ˈvɜːʃən 
trɪˈmɛndəs ədˈvɑːns 
ˈvɪzjʊəli ɪmˈpeəd
ˈmɒdən ˈfiːʧəz 
hɪnt 
ˌɪnəʊˈveɪʃənz tuː kʌm 
ˈvælɪdeɪt 
dɪˈklaɪn 
ˈpʌblɪʃɪŋ ˈɪndəstri
ˌnʌnðəˈlɛs
kənˈsɪdərəbli ˈləʊə 
ɪkˈsɛpʃənz
ˈspɛʃ(ə)laɪz 
ˈsʌbʤɪkt-ˈeərɪə 
ɪmˈplɔɪ ɪnˈtɛlɪʤənt kənˈtrɪbjʊtəz
vɑːst məˈʤɒrɪti 
ˈɒnˌlaɪn njuːz ˈɪndəstri 
ˈsɪnɪkəli pəˈsjuːz 
ˈædvətaɪzɪŋ ˈrɛvɪnjuː 
æt ˈɛni kɒst
ˈrɪtn ˈheɪstɪli
mɪsˈliːdɪŋ
raɪf wɪð ʌnˈʧɛkt fækts 
ˌʌnprəˈfɛʃənl prəʊz
rɪˈtrækʃənz 
rɪˈpɔːtɪŋ ˈɛrəz 
ʌnˈnəʊtɪst
ˌsɪtjʊˈeɪʃən 
kənˈfɜːm ðeə ˈbaɪəsɪz 
geɪn ə ˈməʊməntəri bɜːst ɒv endəʊfins 
aʊt ɒv ˈaʊtreɪʤ
ˈsəʊˈkɔːld 
heɪt-ˈriːdɪŋ
ˈvɛri seɪm ˈriːzn
ˈðeəfɔː ˈʤʌstɪfaɪd 
kleɪm 
rɪˈleɪʃənʃɪp 
ˈpʌblɪʃə 
ˈɛksplɔɪtɪv
ˌɛdju(ː)ˈkeɪʃənl
aʊtˈweɪ 
ɪnˈstɪld 
ˈrɛgjʊleɪt 
ˈprɒpəli 
fɔːlz tuː 
meɪk mɔːr ɪnˈfɔːmd ˈʧɔɪsɪz 
kənˈsjuːmɪŋ ˈmiːdiə

Vocabulary Practice

I recommend getting a pencil and piece of paper because that aids memory. Then write down the missing vocabulary from my sample answer in your notebook:

I________________________________________n now receive their news online, r_______________n from the p__________________s of newspapers. In my opinion, though the c________________s of technology are s____________t, this t______d is a negative o______________e.

P________________s of m_____________s of reading news a_____e it is more c_______________t. Examples of this a__________d. C__________s can search Google or Apple News and l______________s from thousands of online papers and websites, e__________g them to a_______s the news that m_______________________m more e______________y. Furthermore, they can do this w_______e they are c_____________g to work or d___________________________________________________y. It is even p__________e on most websites to listen to an a______________n of the news, a t____________________e for the v__________________d. All these m__________________s of online news only h____t at the i_______________________e and v____________e the d_________e of the p______________________y.

N____________s, the quality of online news is c____________________r on most websites. There are e_____________s, such as websites that s____________e in a given s________________a and e_________________________s, however, the v___________________y of the o_____________________y c_________________________s a______________________e a______________t. Most stories are w_______________y, the headlines are m_____________g, and the news articles themselves may be r____________________s and u_______________________e. R____________s to r__________________s go u_______________d. The s_____________n developing from this is that most individuals now read the news either to c________________s and g__________________________________s or o________________e, s__________________________g‘, for the v_________________n. It is t____________________d to c_____m that the r_______________p between p_________________r and audience is e______________e, not e_________________l.

In conclusion, easier access to news does not o_______________h the bad habits i___________d by online news. Governments will likely never r____________e this industry p____________y so it f________o individuals to m________________s when c___________________a.

Listening Practice

Learn more about this topic in the video below and practice with these activities:

Reading Practice

Read more about this topic and use these ideas to practice:

Speaking Practice

Practice with the following speaking questions from the real IELTS speaking exam:

Newspapers/Magazines

  1. Do you prefer to read newspapers or magazines?
  2. Do you like reading the news online?
  3. Is it more convenient nowadays to read the news online?

Writing Practice

Practice with the related topic below and then check with my sample answer:

In the future, nobody will buy printed newspapers or books because they will be able to read everything they want online without paying.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement?


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