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This is an IELTS writing task 2 sample answer on the topic of languages dying out from the real IELTS exam.

I found the 3rd paragraph really difficult – check it out below!

Also take a look at my online courses here and corrections here.

Dave

Before reading, listen to the audio file to improve your listening:

IELTS Writing Task 2 Sample Answer General Training: Dying Languages (Real Past IELTS Test/Exam)

Many local languages today are dying out due to the rise of languages like English.

Is this a positive or negative development?

The ubiquity of English as a lingua franca is leading to lesser known languages fading away. Although this is a great cultural loss for the world as a whole, it is a positive development for the ethnic groups in question.

Those who regret these loses point out the irreplaceable role of unique languages among ethnic peoples. A good example of this would be in India which is home to 22 national languages and hundreds of unofficial languages in various states of decay. Once a region begins to assimilate and learn English and Hindi, their native tongue becomes antiquated. Since language does more to shape how we see the world than our vision, this also means an interpretation of the world falls away. Over time, younger people will tend to follow global or national trends rather than local ones and the culture itself will be at risk.

Despite the disadvantages mentioned above, assimilation means progress. Western tourists might feel their right to see authentic ethnic minorities is being stripped away, but those groups typically want better lives for themselves and their children. Speaking a language known only to a small group of people greatly limits your opportunities. You can remain in your village and live below the poverty line your entire life or learn a widely-spoken language and be able to travel, work and stay abreast of developments abroad. Even if they do not leave the country, they can move to bigger cities and pursue their passion. Those that remain in their villages, will have better chances of finding online work as well.

In conclusion, the disappearance of smaller languages is inevitable and positive from a purely utilitarian point of view. It would be great to find a means of supporting indigenous tribes that choose to preserve their ancestors way of life.

Word Count: 300

Analysis

1. The ubiquity of English as a lingua franca is leading to lesser known languages fading away. 2. Although this is a great cultural loss for the world as a whole, it is a positive development for the ethnic groups in question.

  1. Paraphrase the overall essay topic.
  2. Give your opinion.

1. Those who regret these loses point out the irreplaceable role of unique languages among ethnic peoples. 2. A good example of this would be in India which is home to 22 national languages and hundreds of unofficial languages in various states of decay. 3. Once a region begins to assimilate and learn English and Hindi, their native tongue becomes antiquated. 4. Since language does more to shape how we see the world than our vision, this also means an interpretation of the world falls away. 5. Over time, younger people will tend to follow global or national trends rather than local ones and the culture itself will be at risk.

  1. Write a clear topic sentence with a single main idea.
  2. Develop it with an example.
  3. Keep developing the example.
  4. State the results of your example.
  5. Further state the results.

1. Despite the disadvantages mentioned above, assimilation means progress. 2. Western tourists might feel their right to see authentic ethnic minorities is being stripped away, but those groups typically want better lives for themselves and their children. 3. Speaking a language known only to a small group of people greatly limits your opportunities. 4. You can remain in your village and live below the poverty line your entire life or learn a widely-spoken language and be able to travel, work and stay abreast of developments abroad. 5. Even if they do not leave the country, they can move to bigger cities and pursue their passion. 6. Those that remain in their villages, will have better chances of finding online work as well.

  1. Another topic sentence with a main idea at the end.
  2. Explain your main idea if it needs explanation.
  3. Develop your main idea with specific, clear support.
  4. Add in as much detail as possible.
  5. Continue with more detail.
  6. The more secific and detailed the better!

1. In conclusion, the disappearance of smaller languages is inevitable and positive from a purely utilitarian point of view. 2. It would be great to find a means of supporting indigenous tribes that choose to preserve their ancestors way of life.

  1. Repeat your opinion.
  2. Add in a final thought/extra detail.

Vocabulary

The ubiquity of English as a lingua franca is leading to lesser known languages fading away. Although this is a great cultural loss for the world as a whole, it is a positive development for the ethnic groups in question.

Those who regret these loses point out the irreplaceable role of unique languages among ethnic peoples. A good example of this would be in India which is home to 22 national languages and hundreds of unofficial languages in various states of decay. Once a region begins to assimilate and learn English and Hindi, their native tongue becomes antiquated. Since language does more to shape how we see the world than our vision, this also means an interpretation of the world falls away. Over time, younger people will tend to follow global or national trends rather than local ones and the culture itself will be at risk.

Despite the disadvantages mentioned above, assimilation means progress. Western tourists might feel their right to see authentic ethnic minorities is being stripped away, but those groups typically want better lives for themselves and their children. Speaking a language known only to a small group of people greatly limits your opportunities. You can remain in your village and live below the poverty line your entire life or learn a widely-spoken language and be able to travel, work and stay abreast of developments abroad. Even if they do not leave the country, they can move to bigger cities and pursue their passion. Those that remain in their villages, will have better chances of finding online work as well.

In conclusion, the disappearance of smaller languages is inevitable and positive from a purely utilitarian point of view. It would be great to find a means of supporting indigenous tribes that choose to preserve their ancestors way of life.

Answers

ubiquity common

lingua franca common language

lesser known not as common

fading away disappearing

great cultural loss loss of heritage

world as a whole globally

ethnic groups in question the relevant minorities

regret feel bad about

irreplaceable role crucial

unique special

national languages common language recognised by the government

unofficial languages smaller languages in a country

various states of decay starting to disappear

assimilate become part of the culture

native tongue native language

antiquated old/outdated

shape mold/influence

vision seeing

interpretation opinion

falls away disappears

tend likely to

follow global or national trends globalisation

at risk in danger

assimilation noun of assimilate

progress modernity

authentic ethnic minorities real groups

stripped away taken away

greatly limits your opportunities not as many options

remain stay

below the poverty line very poor

widely-spoken language common language

abreast up to date about

pursue their passion study/work in the field they want

finding online work getting a job you can work from a computer

inevitable will happen

purely utilitarian point of view completely concerned with the use or practical aspect

supporting indigenous tribes helping ethnic groups

preserve their ancestors way of life keep alive their cultural history

Pronunciation

ju(ː)ˈbɪkwɪti 
ˈlɪŋgwə ˈfræŋkə 
ˈlɛsə nəʊn 
ˈfeɪdɪŋ əˈweɪ
greɪt ˈkʌlʧərəl lɒs 
wɜːld æz ə həʊl
ˈɛθnɪk gruːps ɪn ˈkwɛsʧən
rɪˈgrɛt 
ˌɪrɪˈpleɪsəbl rəʊl 
juːˈniːk 
ˈnæʃənl ˈlæŋgwɪʤɪz 
ˌʌnəˈfɪʃəl ˈlæŋgwɪʤɪz 
ˈveərɪəs steɪts ɒv dɪˈkeɪ
əˈsɪmɪleɪt 
ˈneɪtɪv tʌŋ 
ˈæntɪkweɪtɪd
ʃeɪp 
ˈvɪʒən
ɪnˌtɜːprɪˈteɪʃən 
fɔːlz əˈweɪ
tɛnd 
ˈfɒləʊ ˈgləʊbəl ɔː ˈnæʃənl trɛndz 
æt rɪsk
əˌsɪmɪˈleɪʃ(ə)n 
ˈprəʊgrəs
ɔːˈθɛntɪk ˈɛθnɪk maɪˈnɒrɪtiz 
strɪpt əˈweɪ
ˈgreɪtli ˈlɪmɪts jɔːr ˌɒpəˈtjuːnɪtiz
rɪˈmeɪn 
bɪˈləʊ ðə ˈpɒvəti laɪn 
ˈwaɪdli-ˈspəʊkən ˈlæŋgwɪʤ 
əˈbrɛst 
pəˈsjuː ðeə ˈpæʃən
ˈfaɪndɪŋ ˈɒnˌlaɪn wɜːk 
ɪnˈɛvɪtəbl 
ˈpjʊəli ˌjuːtɪlɪˈteərɪən pɔɪnt ɒv vjuː
səˈpɔːtɪŋ ɪnˈdɪʤɪnəs traɪbz 
prɪˈzɜːv ðeər ˈænsɪstəz weɪ ɒv laɪf

Listen and repeat:

Vocabulary Practice

The u___________ of English as a l___________ is leading to l___________ languages f___________. Although this is a g___________ for the w___________, it is a positive development for the e___________.

Those who r___________ these loses point out the i___________ of u___________ languages among ethnic peoples. A good example of this would be in India which is home to 22 n___________ and hundreds of u___________ in v___________. Once a region begins to a___________ and learn English and Hindi, their n___________ becomes a___________. Since language does more to s___________ how we see the world than our v___________, this also means an i___________ of the world f___________. Over time, younger people will t___________ to f___________ or n___________ rather than local ones and the culture itself will be a___________.

Despite the disadvantages mentioned above, a___________ means p___________. Western tourists might feel their right to see a___________ is being s___________, but those groups typically want better lives for themselves and their children. Speaking a language known only to a small group of people g___________. You can r___________ in your village and live b___________ your entire life or learn a w___________ and be able to travel, work and stay a___________ of developments abroad. Even if they do not leave the country, they can move to bigger cities and p___________. Those that remain in their villages, will have better chances of f___________ as well.

In conclusion, the disappearance of smaller languages is i___________ and positive from a p___________. It would be great to find a means of s___________ that choose to p ___________.

Listen and check:

Listening Practice

Watch the video below for some more ideas and examples in case if a similar question comes up on your exam:

Reading Practice

Read more here about this interesting topic from National Geographic:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2018/04/saving-dying-disappearing-languages-wikitongues-culture/

Speaking Practice

Answer the questions below from the real speaking exam:

Language

  1. Can learning a language help you understand more about a culture?
  2. Why is it so difficult to learn a new language?
  3. How will language learning change in the future?
  4. Should governments invest more in second language learning in schools?
  5. What are the benefits of learning another language for your country?

Writing Practice

Practice with a similar question related to language below:

Living in a country where you have to speak a foreign language can cause serious social problems, as well as practical problems.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement?

Real Past IELTS Tests/Exams

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